Education & Informational Videos


Budgeting


  • Owning vs. Renting a Home

    Whether it’s better for you to own or rent your home ultimately comes down a combination of personal and financial factors. Which factors are most important to you?
  • Know Your Checking Account

    Balancing your checkbook gives you power—the power of knowing exactly how much money is available to you. Whether you use a checkbook register, a spreadsheet on your computer or an app on your mobile device, balancing your checkbook is a good habit to form.
  • Building A Budget

    In this guide, we’ll be using the 50/30/20 budget as a starting point. It was first introduced in a book written by Elizabeth Warren and Amelia Warren Tyagi, but has since been widely adopted as an effective intro to budgeting.
  • Writing A Business Plan

    Whether your business is a fragment of an idea or already up and running, writing a business plan is a versatile and powerful tool that will help you run your business thoughtfully and successfully.
  • Strategies for Debt Repayment

    As you sequentially pay off your debts, you’ll have more money to apply to the next debt on the list. Debt repayment requires action, some discipline and a lot of patience.
  • Pay Yourself First

    Paying yourself first is an effective savings strategy because it takes willpower right out of the equation. Rather than struggling to increase your self-control, you simply reduce your need to put it in action.
  • Growing Your Money Locally

    Find out a few creative ways that you can boost your local economy without spending a single cent.
  • Saving for Retirement

    It’s hard to do (especially if your retirement is decades away), but designing the life you want can be motivating.
  • Income Essentials

    Finding your dream career is challenging on its own, and only made more difficult by others’ expectations and our own biases. Be mindful of your goals—any job that helps you achieve them is a benchmark for success. Remember that interests and skills change and develop over time, and therefore the need to make and reassess your career goals will continue through high school, college and beyond. Your career is important, and it deserves some serious reflection time.
  • Good vs Bad Spending

    The act of creating a budget contributes to your ability to follow it through. It solidifies your values, it promotes competence and it highlights your achievements as you work through it. Incorporating Prioritize, Track, Reward into your budgeting method of choice will boost your motivation while tackling your personal finance goals at the same time.
  • Earning Money Online

    While some of us dream of a wildly successful Internet career, the rest of us are happy to settle for online earnings that are a little more modest. Thousands of money-making opportunities are just a web search away. Whether you’re selling your old stuff, scoping out freelance opportunities or running your own digital storefront, there are tools and resources to help you along every step of the way.
  • Rule of 72

    Everyone has some idea of what it means to be money smart — however, whether or not you’ve acted on that idea is a different story! There are a few nuggets of financial wisdom in particular that are echoed so many times in articles, blog posts and TV segments that they become clichés, albeit practical ones. Curb your spending. Pay off your debt. Contribute to your savings early and often. Compound interest is your friend. Start saving now and watch your money grow.
  • Organizing Your Finances

    Sorting through financial documents is a pretty straightforward process once you figure out how long you need to hang onto specific types of documents. Doing a periodic cleanup will save you time and hassle in the long run, and will keep your desk drawers and filing cabinets clutter-free in the meantime!
  • Demystifying Mortgages

    On the surface, home ownership can seem like a smart and appealing option, especially if your mortgage payments work out to be lower than what you would be paying to rent. However, rushing into a mortgage can set you up for a ton of stress (financial and otherwise). Before you buy, check in with yourself to make sure that you’re well prepared, that the timing is right and that you’re doing it for the right reasons.
  • How to Save On Groceries

    We tend to be creatures of habit; as a result, it can be difficult to introduce change into our routines. Not every generic product you try will be a winner, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t any generic winners out there! Instead of overhauling your entire shopping list all at once, try swapping out one or two products every time you go to the store and see what works for you. Over time, you’ll be able to keep your household running while saving some cash at the same time
  • Understanding Inflation

    Increasing the rate of return on your savings through investing is the best way to counter the effects of inflation, and it will help ensure that the money you save today will have the purchasing power to afford what you need in the future.
  • Emergency Fund Boot Camp

    The reality is that emergency expenses come in many forms and that there are less traumatic examples out there that would be equally good at messing up your financial situation, so it might make more sense to think of your emergency fund as a “life happens” fund.
  • Budgeting Basics

    Budgets are like the New Year’s resolutions of personal finance. We all know we should have one and we all know it’s a fairly simple thing to follow—at least in theory.

Credit Card


  • Strategies for Debt Repayment

    As you sequentially pay off your debts, you’ll have more money to apply to the next debt on the list. Debt repayment requires action, some discipline and a lot of patience.
  • Using Your Credit Card

    A little bit of knowledge and self-discipline is all it takes to successfully use the “pay it in full and on time” strategy. This approach allows you to fully enjoy the convenience and rewards of your credit card while contributing to a positive credit history that will serve you well when it comes time to make a large purchase. There’s no need to be shy when using your credit card responsibly.
  • Visa Checkout

    Discover the easy way to check out online!
  • Comparing Cards

    It's a decision that comes into play for every bill you pay, every tank of gas you buy and every coffee you pick up on the way to class or work. Cash, check or card? Debit, credit or prepaid debit? You make this decision so many times a day that it might seem common and unimportant. After all, different forms of payment are just different ways to access funds, so what difference does it really make if you put your breakfast sandwich on credit instead of debit?
  • Boost Your Credit Score

    Credit scores are an area of personal finance that seem a lot more mysterious than they actually are. Many people believe that improving them is a matter of trial and error and, as a result, there’s a lot of “credit score advice” floating around that can end up doing more harm than good.
  • Breakdown of a Credit Score

    A credit score is a number (usually between 300 and 850) that represents your creditworthiness. It’s a standardized measurement that financial institutions and credit card companies use to determine risk level when considering issuing you a loan or a credit card. Basically, it provides a snapshot of how likely you are to repay your debts on time. Widespread use of credit scores has made credit more widely available and less expensive for many consumers.

Insurance


  • Intro to Insurance

    Insurance policies are complex, but your attitude towards them can be straightforward. Insurance policies are not designed to grow your money—they’re designed to protect you and your family from significant loss by transferring your financial risk associated with a specific set of unpredictable circumstances. It’s up to you to determine which unpredictable circumstances warrant protection (and how much protection to have in place), but by simply identifying the role of insurance in your financial plan, you’ll be better prepared to make smart decisions about what to insure.

Investment


  • Owning vs. Renting a Home

    Whether it’s better for you to own or rent your home ultimately comes down a combination of personal and financial factors. Which factors are most important to you?
  • Writing A Business Plan

    Whether your business is a fragment of an idea or already up and running, writing a business plan is a versatile and powerful tool that will help you run your business thoughtfully and successfully.
  • Trends in the Stock Market

    Bulls and bears can be considered the unofficial mascots of the stock market. They represent the upward and downward movements of the stock market over a period of time and have even come to describe investor behavior (optimistic investors are said to be bullish, while investors with a pessimistic outlook are said to be bearish). In a field typically known for its confusing financial terminology and often uninspired language, the bull and bear symbols really stand out.
  • Rule of 72

    Everyone has some idea of what it means to be money smart — however, whether or not you’ve acted on that idea is a different story! There are a few nuggets of financial wisdom in particular that are echoed so many times in articles, blog posts and TV segments that they become clichés, albeit practical ones. Curb your spending. Pay off your debt. Contribute to your savings early and often. Compound interest is your friend. Start saving now and watch your money grow.
  • Understanding Inflation

    Increasing the rate of return on your savings through investing is the best way to counter the effects of inflation, and it will help ensure that the money you save today will have the purchasing power to afford what you need in the future.

Loans


  • Building A Budget

    In this guide, we’ll be using the 50/30/20 budget as a starting point. It was first introduced in a book written by Elizabeth Warren and Amelia Warren Tyagi, but has since been widely adopted as an effective intro to budgeting.
  • Writing A Business Plan

    Whether your business is a fragment of an idea or already up and running, writing a business plan is a versatile and powerful tool that will help you run your business thoughtfully and successfully.
  • Strategies for Debt Repayment

    As you sequentially pay off your debts, you’ll have more money to apply to the next debt on the list. Debt repayment requires action, some discipline and a lot of patience.
  • Buying a Used Car

    Whether you are buying a car privately or from a dealer, credit unions are often an overlooked source of legitimate and affordable auto financing. Many people make a mistake in thinking that they can’t get a loan to buy a better car, so they end up settling for a junker.
  • Student Loans 101

    Whether you’re a first-time student or a returning student, it’s in your absolute best interest to whittle down your education costs as much as possible before considering a student loan or alternative financing option. Your future self will thank you.
  • Demystifying Mortgages

    On the surface, home ownership can seem like a smart and appealing option, especially if your mortgage payments work out to be lower than what you would be paying to rent. However, rushing into a mortgage can set you up for a ton of stress (financial and otherwise). Before you buy, check in with yourself to make sure that you’re well prepared, that the timing is right and that you’re doing it for the right reasons.
  • Investment Vehicles

    Time plays a significant role when it comes to investing. It can give you more control over your investments, it can increase your tolerance for risk and your ability to recover from any losses, and it can maximize your returns. By starting early, investing wisely and giving yourself the time you need to reach your goals, you will discover the positive impact that a little bit of planning today will have on your lifestyle in the future.
  • Loan Basics

    A loan is also one of the biggest financial commitments we make in our lifetime. Rushing into a loan without fully understanding how it will affect your budget can create a very stressful situation that can quickly spiral out of control. The good news is that you can avoid this stress entirely by choosing the loan that’s right for you.
  • Leasing vs Buying a New Car

    When it comes to buying a new car, you have three options: purchasing it with cash, purchasing it through a loan (also known as financing) or leasing it. For most shoppers, the decision comes down to buying or leasing.
  • Compound Interest Mind Bend

    You may remember it as an equation you had to memorize for math class, but it’s so much more than that. It’s the concept that powers all sorts of savings and investment products and, over time, allows you to turn your money into, well, more money!
  • Boost Your Credit Score

    Credit scores are an area of personal finance that seem a lot more mysterious than they actually are. Many people believe that improving them is a matter of trial and error and, as a result, there’s a lot of “credit score advice” floating around that can end up doing more harm than good.
  • Breakdown of a Credit Score

    A credit score is a number (usually between 300 and 850) that represents your creditworthiness. It’s a standardized measurement that financial institutions and credit card companies use to determine risk level when considering issuing you a loan or a credit card. Basically, it provides a snapshot of how likely you are to repay your debts on time. Widespread use of credit scores has made credit more widely available and less expensive for many consumers.
  • Predatory Lending

    Ultimately, you should know that you are in control, even if you find yourself in financial difficulties. There are plenty of alternatives to avoid high-cost borrowing from predatory lenders. Take time to explore your options.

Security


  • How to Spot Scams

    Whether it’s online, over the phone or in person, scammers are always coming up with new ways of influencing their targets to act in ways they might not otherwise. By staying calm in high-stress situations and by giving ourselves a little extra time to think, we’re better able to spot recurring scammers’ favorite tactics, to avoid a state of amygdala hijack and to save ourselves from making costly mistakes.
  • Foiling Identity Theft

    Identity theft is nothing new, and yet it still manages to cost its victims billions of dollars (yes, that’s billions with a “b”) globally each year—not to mention the time and hassle involved in recovering a stolen identity. The good news is that there are tons of things you can do to deter identity thieves.

Students


  • Owning vs. Renting a Home

    Whether it’s better for you to own or rent your home ultimately comes down a combination of personal and financial factors. Which factors are most important to you?
  • Know Your Checking Account

    Balancing your checkbook gives you power—the power of knowing exactly how much money is available to you. Whether you use a checkbook register, a spreadsheet on your computer or an app on your mobile device, balancing your checkbook is a good habit to form.
  • Building A Budget

    In this guide, we’ll be using the 50/30/20 budget as a starting point. It was first introduced in a book written by Elizabeth Warren and Amelia Warren Tyagi, but has since been widely adopted as an effective intro to budgeting.
  • Writing A Business Plan

    Whether your business is a fragment of an idea or already up and running, writing a business plan is a versatile and powerful tool that will help you run your business thoughtfully and successfully.
  • Using Your Credit Card

    A little bit of knowledge and self-discipline is all it takes to successfully use the “pay it in full and on time” strategy. This approach allows you to fully enjoy the convenience and rewards of your credit card while contributing to a positive credit history that will serve you well when it comes time to make a large purchase. There’s no need to be shy when using your credit card responsibly.
  • Pay Yourself First

    Paying yourself first is an effective savings strategy because it takes willpower right out of the equation. Rather than struggling to increase your self-control, you simply reduce your need to put it in action.
  • Growing Your Money Locally

    Find out a few creative ways that you can boost your local economy without spending a single cent.
  • Don't Bank Boring. BANK AWESOME!

    See one of our prior JHFCU interns explain credit unions.
  • After Graduation -- Work or College

    Whether you start out by getting a degree or by joining the workforce, your career path should be designed to lead you to your dream job.
  • Acing The Job Interview

    In preparing for a job interview, it’s easy to focus on how you’re meeting others’ expectations of you, instead of considering what expectations you have for your next job and future employer. The three mindsets outlined in this video serve as gentle reminders that, despite its unknowns and stresses, the job interview is ultimately an empowering experience that brings you closer to your career goals, and your life goals.
  • Buying a Used Car

    Whether you are buying a car privately or from a dealer, credit unions are often an overlooked source of legitimate and affordable auto financing. Many people make a mistake in thinking that they can’t get a loan to buy a better car, so they end up settling for a junker.
  • Student Loans 101

    Whether you’re a first-time student or a returning student, it’s in your absolute best interest to whittle down your education costs as much as possible before considering a student loan or alternative financing option. Your future self will thank you.
  • Income Essentials

    Finding your dream career is challenging on its own, and only made more difficult by others’ expectations and our own biases. Be mindful of your goals—any job that helps you achieve them is a benchmark for success. Remember that interests and skills change and develop over time, and therefore the need to make and reassess your career goals will continue through high school, college and beyond. Your career is important, and it deserves some serious reflection time.
  • Good vs Bad Spending

    The act of creating a budget contributes to your ability to follow it through. It solidifies your values, it promotes competence and it highlights your achievements as you work through it. Incorporating Prioritize, Track, Reward into your budgeting method of choice will boost your motivation while tackling your personal finance goals at the same time.
  • Earning Money Online

    While some of us dream of a wildly successful Internet career, the rest of us are happy to settle for online earnings that are a little more modest. Thousands of money-making opportunities are just a web search away. Whether you’re selling your old stuff, scoping out freelance opportunities or running your own digital storefront, there are tools and resources to help you along every step of the way.
  • Rule of 72

    Everyone has some idea of what it means to be money smart — however, whether or not you’ve acted on that idea is a different story! There are a few nuggets of financial wisdom in particular that are echoed so many times in articles, blog posts and TV segments that they become clichés, albeit practical ones. Curb your spending. Pay off your debt. Contribute to your savings early and often. Compound interest is your friend. Start saving now and watch your money grow.
  • Organizing Your Finances

    Sorting through financial documents is a pretty straightforward process once you figure out how long you need to hang onto specific types of documents. Doing a periodic cleanup will save you time and hassle in the long run, and will keep your desk drawers and filing cabinets clutter-free in the meantime!
  • How to Save On Groceries

    We tend to be creatures of habit; as a result, it can be difficult to introduce change into our routines. Not every generic product you try will be a winner, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t any generic winners out there! Instead of overhauling your entire shopping list all at once, try swapping out one or two products every time you go to the store and see what works for you. Over time, you’ll be able to keep your household running while saving some cash at the same time
  • Living On Your Own

    Living on your own for the first time can be empowering. It means having independence and all the things that come with it. Some of those things—like not having to share a bathroom—are wonderful. Others—like killing spiders yourself—are not so fun. And leading the pack in the not-so-fun category: bills.
  • Emergency Fund Boot Camp

    The reality is that emergency expenses come in many forms and that there are less traumatic examples out there that would be equally good at messing up your financial situation, so it might make more sense to think of your emergency fund as a “life happens” fund.

Taxes


  • Let’s Talk Taxes

    Your pay stub is more than just proof of income. It allows you to better understand your personal finances and to make informed decisions when it comes to budgeting and tax time.